Recommended Supernatural Episodes for a Sensitive First-Timer


I’m not very sensitive, squeamish, or impressionable when it comes to intensity, violence, and gore (Supernatural has generous amounts of these). My mother, however, is. Still, I really wanted to share it with her because I thought that she would enjoy the parts without gore. So Feral Atom, road-sine, and I picked a few of our favorite, less gory, episodes for her to watch. Here are three of them, with additional warnings and explanations for your sensitive first-timer:

Season 4: Episode 5, Monster Movie
“Monster Movie” spoofs old monster movies and is even in black and white. It is one of the least intense or scary episodes of the series, one centered more around humor than horror. The only scene with gore is when Sam and Dean are at the morgue after the werewolf attack, examining the victim’s remains. Little is shown and it doesn’t last more than a minute.

A little background is necessary to get some of the humor. In Supernatural, vampires don’t suck blood through two fangs, have the corny getups, or have the slicked-back hair. Crosses and garlic don’t have any affect on them, and light is more of an annoyance than anything else. Vampires in the show look and act like normal people, until they feed. Then they unsheathe numerable fangs, which, as you can imagine, make a pretty messy wound. They can only be killed by beheading. Two early vampire episodes are Season 1, Episode 20, “Dead Man’s Blood” and Season 2 Episode 3, “Bloodlust.” These have more gore and violence than “Monster Movie,” however, and I wouldn’t recommend them to a sensitive first-timer.

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Vampires can blend in seamlessly with humans.

Similarly, werewolves in Supernatural aren’t like typical werewolves. They don’t grow canine hair, although their teeth sharpen. They follow the full-moon mythos and can be killed by silver. A great episode to watch to get an idea of Supernatural werewolves is Season 2, Episode 17, “Heart.” Again, I wouldn’t recommend it to a sensitive first-timer.

Season 2: Episode 15, Tall Tales
Sam and Dean look into a possible haunting, and their case gets progressively stranger. This is another humorous episode, and a first-time viewer would need to know a bit about the brothers to understand the jokes. Watching “Monster Movie” beforehand might help give you a better idea of what the characters are like.

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Sam is more empathetic and understanding to the people they talk to than Dean. Sam wants to really help the people, whereas Dean is usually brash and less sympathetic toward witnesses or victims of supernatural events. Dean is outwardly confident, particularly where ladies are concerned. He has kind of frat-boyish tendencies: he’s pretty messy and eats what he wants. The brothers contrast well to each other, creating a good dynamic. In “Tall Tales,” however, their very different personalities clash.

Season 5: Episode 8, Changing Channels
Another funny episode, featuring the Trickster again. For this episode, it’s good to have watched “Tall Tales” and Season 3, Episode 11, “Mystery Spot.” The latter is a bit more violent than the three episodes listed here, but is a very fun and humorous episode.

To understand the references at the end of the episode, you will need some background on Seasons 4 and 5. Angels need to have human vessels to interact with things on Earth. They must have permission from the human before possessing them. Extremely powerful angels can only inhabit their “true vessels,” or people strong enough to hold them, without destroying the person’s body. Dean is the angel Michael’s true vessel, and Sam is Lucifer’s (Lucifer was once an angel, so the rules still apply to him).

Castiel is an angel that sometimes helps Sam and Dean, and they help him in return. His powers are somewhat diminished now because he disobeyed heaven while helping Dean.

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